Tag Archives: Halloween

Kids and Halloween Candy

Posted by Marianne Frederick

Halloween candy can be a genuine treat – or a scary trick – if parents don’t set limits for their children. We’re not thinking as much about childhood obesity right now as we are concerned simply about kids’ candy consumption and what parents can do to discourage the over-consumption of candy. Here are some tips:

  • Serving a healthful meal before kids go trick-or-treating is a great idea, as kids fill up on the good stuff, and then may not be too hungry for candy.
  • Know how much and what kind of candy your child has collected–ours empty their pillow cases brimming with candy, and display their haul on the kitchen table, so we can see what’s wrapped, what isn’t and remove any they should not have.
  • Store your child’s candy somewhere other than in his room! Access to the candy is half of the battle in helping to curb the amount of candy consumed.
  • Be a good role model by only consuming a small amount of candy yourself–and saving some for another day.
  • Encourage your children to be aware of the amount of candy and snacks they eat, and to stop before they are aware of feeling full or ill.
  • Offer non-food Halloween treats, like stickers, small toys and small games (like decks of cards or things you might find in a “party” store). You can always offer sugar-free candy, small bags of pretzels, small bags of popcorn, small boxes of raisins–even small boxes of cereal. Don’t give anything–toys or candy–on which children, especially very young children, could choke.

Schools in some communities have programs where a portion of every child’s wrapped candy can be donated to children in the hospital who didn’t have an opportunity to go trick-or-treating. Call your community hospital to learn if this is a possibility in your area and ask them what kind of candy donations are permitted or if there is a program your child can donate candy to for this purpose.

Make sure to have a safe and happy Halloween!

Safe Halloween Costumes for Your Child

Posted by Marianne Frederick

It’s two weeks until Halloween. If you’re like me, you don’t even begin to think about Halloween costumes until about 3 days beforehand. However, this year, I vow to do better: to plan ahead and help choose the safest possible costumes.

Whether you are making or buying the Halloween costume, parents should consider what else will be on the Halloween scene. Certainly, pumpkins, sometimes with candles in them, otherwise known as jack-o’-lanterns, will be glowing on doorsteps and on front porches. So parents will want to think about “flame resistant” costumes. Many costumes use glitter, tinsel, feathers, glue, cardboard and other materials that are extremely flammable. So how to make children’s costumes less flammable?

Parents Magazine suggests a safer choice for costume fabric would be to use synthetic, flame resistant material rather than cotton, as flames can travel quickly along woven cotton. Also, capes and costumes that drape and drag the ground are not the safest choice for flammability or mobility. Keep in mind that it’s difficult for a child to see what a cape could brush against if a child is wearing any kind of mask. For safety’s sake, the less fabric involved in your child’s Halloween costume, the better; in the best case, your child’s Halloween costume should be well fitted to him or her.

To avoid, Halloween fall injuries, make sure children can see their feet, and that their ability to walk or run is not impeded by clumsy or over-sized shoes, or costumes that are too long. Accessories, like purses with long shoulder straps, belts, toy swords, wings, etc., should not cause children to lose their balance or trip and fall.

If they are wearing a mask, it should not impede their ability to see or breathe. If the mask is made of rubber or plastic, try the mask on yourself and see if you can breathe easily, if not, cut a bigger hole for easy breathing–or ditch the mask!

One more important safe-costume caution is to make sure children wear costumes which make them visible at night–Some day-glow paint, bright orange fabric or even runner’s arm-band strobe lights are all things which brighten up a costume.

Lastly, as we do every year, we suggest, that parents stay in close proximity–go with your young child on Halloween, and take a flashlight along. You’ll have a lot of fun watching them, and you’ll be there if they need you. Halloween is exciting and young children can tire easily. It’s always good to have parents and caregivers on hand to keep track of the ghosts, goblins and princesses… not to mention the dragons and mummies!

Happy Halloween!!!!

Hello everyone!

I can’t believe it’s Halloween again.  We here at CSB hope everyone has a great time — here are some reminders to keep everyone as safe as possible:

Halloween Safety Tips –

  • Wear light colored or reflective clothing/costumes OR buy reflective tape (sold at any hardware or big box store) and place on costume.  3M makes good reflective tape.
  • Make sure your kids have flashlights.
  • Make sure costumes don’t drag on the ground – long costumes present an increased fire hazard.
  • Talk with your children about not getting too close to jack-o-lanterns with candles, or any other open flames.
  • Young children should have a parent with them when trick-or-treating.
  • It’s much more safe for children to travel in groups then by themselves or in pairs.
  • Take masks off between houses (better yet, don’t get a costume with a mask).
  • Don’t cut through yards — use driveways and walks.
  • The best neighborhoods for trick-or-treating are the ones with the fewest cars.  Take extra time to impress on your children the need to be on the lookout for cars – they will be excited and crossing the street often.  They absolutely need to stop and look before crossing, and young children need to wait for a parent before crossing.
  • Feed your kids dinner beforehand — lessens the candy intake (at least a little bit).
  • If your older kids are going out alone, it’s best for them to have a cellphone or some means of communicating with you.
  • Inspect your children’s candy for open packaging or anything else that might be suspicious.
  • AND, although not safety related, talk to your kids about being polite, saying thank you, and not grabbing handfuls of candy when offered.

BE SAFE AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Halloween Child Safety Tips

My seven year old is going as Gabriella from High School Musical, my five year old as a witch, my 17 month old as a fireman, and my 7 month old as a firehouse dog.  Here’s what we’re doing and telling them so that they’ll be as safe as possible.  If any one else has any good tips, let me know and I’ll include them next year.  By the way, Jane, Libby and I saw HSM3 over the weekend — all in all not bad.

Halloween Safety Tips –

  • Wear light colored or reflective clothing/costumes OR buy reflective tape (sold at any hardware or big box store) and place on costume.  3M makes good reflective tape.
  • Make sure your kids have flashlights.
  • Make sure costumes don’t drag on the ground – long costumes present an increased fire hazard.
  • Talk with your children about not getting too close to jack-o-lanterns with candles, or any other open flames.
  • Young children should have a parent with them when trick-or-treating.
  • It’s much more safe for children to travel in groups then by themselves or in pairs.
  • Take masks off between houses (better yet, don’t get a costume with a mask).
  • Don’t cut through yards — use driveways and walks.
  • The best neighborhoods for trick-or-treating are the ones with the fewest cars.  Take extra time to impress on your children the need to be on the lookout for cars – they will be excited and crossing the street often.  They absolutely need to stop and look before crossing, and young children need to wait for a parent before crossing.
  • Feed your kids dinner beforehand — lessens the candy intake (at least a little bit).
  • If your older kids are going out alone, it’s best for them to have a cellphone or some means of communicating with you.
  • Inspect your children’s candy for open packaging or anything else that might be suspicious.
  • AND, although not safety related, talk to your kids about being polite, saying thank you, and not grabbing handfuls of candy when offered.

BE SAFE AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!