Tag Archives: small parts in toys

Toy Recalls and Another Look At Lead in Children’s Jewelry!

In accordance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the well-known children’s toy manufacturer, Fisher-Price, voluntarily recalled another children’s toy this past week.  Little People Play ‘n Go Campsite™ looked like a very attractive toy for kids.  Fisher-Price, based in East Aurora, New York, has produced and sold generations of parents their colorful, sturdy, good-looking toys for children; however, on August 5th, CPSC found it necessary to urge Fisher-Price to immediately recall 96,000 of the toys which were manufactured in China and exported to the U.S. and sold in the U.S. and Canada (14,000) from October 2009 through August 2010, for approximately $15.

The recall is due to the presence of small parts which may represent a choking hazard.  For a visual of this toy, go to the CPSC recall website located on the web at: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml10/10313.html

The particular small parts found in the Play n’ Go Campsite set’s “Sonya Lee” doll, which bends at the waist, are the specific potential hazard.  The doll can break at the waist causing small parts to be exposed.  CPSC notes: “The seven-piece plastic play set includes Sonya Lee, a tent and other accessories. Product number R6935 is printed on the toy’s packaging. The name, Sonya Lee, is printed on the underside of the figure. The remaining pieces of the Little People Play ‘n Go Campsite are not affected.”

As parents, caregivers, and family members, we know small children love to put things in their mouths which don’t necessarily belong there and we must continue to remain vigilant about what they put in their mouths.  At the same time, this child safety blogger notes that it is a disappointment to see toys that are less than safe arrive from China for sale to parents of America’s children!

Recently, Good Housekeeping (June 2010, p. 128) published a brief article entitled “Lead in Kids’ Jewelry.” GH’s investigative reporters spotted some jewelry that actually bore warnings that the jewelry was “not for children under ages 7”- despite the jewelry’s obvious appeal directed to small children.  Good Housekeeping became suspicious and had a variety of children’s earrings and necklaces they purchased at Wal-Mart and Target analyzed: “All 7 items contained lead well above the legal limit for children’s products.” Most of the products also contained cadmium (another heavy metal which can be poisonous if consumed)”!

So again, we need to be more than vigilant when visiting the children’s jewelry counter.  According to GH, one small stud earring from Wal-Mart contained “124 times the permissible lead level for kids.”  Along with Good Housekeeping, ChildSafetyBlog.org recommends:  Keep all jewelry away from young children! While ingesting an item containing heavy metals may not cause immediate harm or death, parents and caregivers need to immediately call Poison Control (1-800-222-1222) if your child swallows such an item!